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RE: FW: USA Africa Dialogue Series - STAR QUESTION: What Possessed Him? Rajat Gupta's Great Fall and America's Indian Elites

True. Thank you.

 

From: usaafricadialogue@googlegroups.com [mailto:usaafricadialogue@googlegroups.com] On Behalf Of Mobolaji Aluko
Sent: Sunday, June 30, 2013 4:04 PM
To: USAAfrica Dialogue
Subject: Re: FW: USA Africa Dialogue Series - STAR QUESTION: What Possessed Him? Rajat Gupta's Great Fall and America's Indian Elites

 

 

Anunoby Ogugua:

 

It may be simpler and less conspiratorial than you put it.  I call it the Highway Speed Mentality....when you see everyone speeding beyond the limit (breaking the law), and you join in, only to be the one flagged down....and you dare not tell the Policeman that "everyone is speeding", because that is an admission of guilt.

 

So when you see everyone speeding past you, or you are gaining up on others, one should be cautious to slow down:  you may be flagged, particularly if you are driving a flashy red (colored?) car!

 

And there you have it.

 

 

 

Bolaji Aluko

 

 

On Sun, Jun 30, 2013 at 3:02 PM, Anunoby, Ogugua <AnunobyO@lincolnu.edu> wrote:

I might have Gloria. Thank you.
Success corrupts the unwary it seems to me. The man's success in corporate America may have caused him to believe that he was greater, smarter, more indispensable than he really was. It is thinking like that that helps to make successful people less thoughtful and risk averse than they are advised, and need to be. The bigger the fish, the more determined the fisherman. One must always remember who one is, where the one has come from,  where one is, and sometimes what time it is.

oa




-----Original Message-----
From: usaafricadialogue@googlegroups.com [mailto:usaafricadialogue@googlegroups.com] On Behalf Of Emeagwali, Gloria (History)
Sent: Saturday, June 29, 2013 8:23 AM
To: usaafricadialogue@googlegroups.com; NaijaPolitics e-Group; naijaintellects; OmoOdua; nigerianid@yahoogroups.com; Ra'ayi; ekiti ekitigroups; Yan Arewa
Subject: RE: USA Africa Dialogue Series - STAR QUESTION: What Possessed Him? Rajat Gupta's Great Fall and America's Indian Elites


You may  have  missed one point, OA. This guy was seen as a threat to the ' regular'
capitalists. There  may be  a pigmentation and ethnic  factor in the mix. What of all the corrupt banking  and housing miscreants who remain untouched? This is to send a message to potential  immigrant rivals.
This is not to say that he  is completely innocent, though.





Professor Gloria Emeagwali
africahistory.net
vimeo.com/user5946750/videos
Documentaries on Africa and the African Diaspora


________________________________
From: usaafricadialogue@googlegroups.com [usaafricadialogue@googlegroups.com] On Behalf Of Anunoby, Ogugua [AnunobyO@lincolnu.edu]
Sent: Saturday, June 29, 2013 6:32 AM
To: usaafricadialogue@googlegroups.com; NaijaPolitics e-Group; naijaintellects; OmoOdua; nigerianid@yahoogroups.com; Ra'ayi; ekiti ekitigroups; Yan Arewa
Subject: RE: USA Africa Dialogue Series - STAR QUESTION: What Possessed Him? Rajat Gupta's Great Fall and America's Indian Elites

"An object lesson for all immigrants" everywhere.
Oliver de Coque, the late Nigerian musical artist famously said that "a town belongs to some and not all who live in her". There are landlords and there are tenants . One recalls that in the movie "West Side Story" all are reminded that "everything is good in America if you stay on your own side". I would say "the right side". There is who one is. There is who one believes the one is. It is important to know the difference. Power and influence do not always come with professional success, especially away from home. There are exceptions and limits. Everyone is advised to know who they really are, and how a system that might hit them works. Does Rajat Gupta deserve some sympathy? May be. Should he have known better? Certainly.
The corruption gene (if there is any such thing) may be evenly distributed in the human race but it is more recessive in some countries than in others. Are there more corrupt people in India than "in America"? Yes probably. India seems to be more tolerant of corruption. India has more people. Then again, what is corruption?

oa



From: usaafricadialogue@googlegroups.com [mailto:usaafricadialogue@googlegroups.com] On Behalf Of Mobolaji Aluko
Sent: Thursday, June 27, 2013 10:09 PM
To: USAAfrica Dialogue; NaijaPolitics e-Group; naijaintellects; OmoOdua; nigerianid@yahoogroups.com; Ra'ayi; ekiti ekitigroups; Yan Arewa
Subject: USA Africa Dialogue Series - STAR QUESTION: What Possessed Him? Rajat Gupta's Great Fall and America's Indian Elites


QUOTE


One person asked me if I had been naïve in suggesting that [Rajat Gupta] had been played when I know that corruption is rampant in India. But when I was writing the book, I wanted to be very careful. I know corruption is widespread in India, but I believe that corruption the gene is evenly distributed. There aren't more corrupt people in India than there are in America. That's why this story is so important: The misstep of one casts a shadow on all. Rajat Gupta had a responsibility not only to conduct himself well for his own sake, but also for his children and all other Indians.

UNQUOTE


An object lesson for all immigrants here.....



Bolaji Aluko

----------------------------------------------------

http://www.thefinancialist.com/what-possessed-him-rajat-guptas-great-fall-and-americas-indian-elites/

The Financialist



*         ABOUT<http://www.thefinancialist.com/about/>
*         NEWSLETTER<http://www.thefinancialist.com/about/#about-newsletter>
*         LIVING WELL<http://www.thefinancialist.com/category/living-well/>
*         INVESTING<http://www.thefinancialist.com/category/investing/>
*         AFFAIRS<http://www.thefinancialist.com/category/affairs/>
*         AFFAIRS: Q&A<http://www.thefinancialist.com/category/affairs/qa-affairs/>
What Possessed Him? Rajat Gupta's Great Fall and America's Indian Elites Former Goldman Sachs board member Rajat Gupta exits Manhattan federal court after a pre-trial hearing last year in New York. (Photo by Seth Wenig, Associated Press.)

BY: ARIEL RAMCHANDANI
PUBLISHED: JUNE 24, 2013

For many people, the biggest shock of the Galleon Group's insider trading case was not the implosion of the hedge fund group, nor the conviction of its leader, Raj Rajaratnam. It was the indictment-and subsequent conviction-of Rajaratnam's friend, Rajat Gupta. The former managing director of McKinsey & Company, Gupta was not only one of the most respected members of the Indian-American business community, but he had achieved even greater public renown as a leading global philanthropist in his post-McKinsey career. His fall from grace was the true shocker in an already-scandalous affair.


Last year, Gupta was sentenced to two years in prison for sharing confidential information he learned as a board member of both Goldman Sachs and Procter & Gamble with Rajaratnam. In a new book, "The Billionaire's Apprentice: The Rise of The Indian-American Elite and The Fall of The Galleon Hedge Fund," journalist Anita Raghavan seeks to find out why Gupta risked his stellar reputation in joining forces with Rajaratnam. She chronicles Gupta's life from his childhood in post-partition India through his tenure at McKinsey, the world's most elite consulting firm. The tale culminates with Gupta's fall at the hands of New York federal prosecutor Preet Bharara, who was also born in India but raised in the U.S. Through Gupta's story, Raghavan also provides an inside look at the community of Indian elites in the United States.

The Financialist: Why did you frame your story around Gupta instead of Rajaratnam, who was at the center of the federal insider trading case?
Anita Raghavan: Of all the protagonists in the Galleon hedge fund case, Gupta was the most interesting. He came from very humble roots, and as a teenager, he lost both of his parents. He shouldered all the responsibility of the family, and he worked very hard to get himself to America, then to Harvard Business School, and then to McKinsey. He served three terms as McKinsey's managing director, and his Rolodex included Kofi Annan and Bill Gates. I was intrigued by the question of why someone who had so much going for him got involved with a short-term trader like Raj Rajaratnam, who was so different from him.

TF: So what did you ultimately conclude?

AR: When Gupta came back to New York in the 1990s, his world changed. For most of his career, he had worked in the hinterlands of Scandinavia and Chicago. When he came to New York, he started lusting after things he didn't care about before. Here was a man who had bought his previous homes sight unseen. But then he purchased one of the most storied pieces of real estate in Connecticut, a palatial estate once owned by the founder of J.C. Penney. He started mingling with a group of financiers. I think he felt out of their league-at least financially speaking-and he wanted to be part of that group.


There's a wonderful talk he gave at Columbia Business School about a year after he stepped down from the helm of McKinsey. You can see in that speech a man really casting about for what he wanted to do next in life and not feeling entirely at peace. At one point, someone asked him, "Are you happy?" and he said, "On some level, I'm happy. On other levels, I'm in the midst of a professional transition, and I'm not so happy."

TF: Gupta's success at McKinsey opened the door for many more Indian leaders in business. He was an icon. Who will replace him in the Indian-American imagination?
AR: I don't think there is anyone with the influence and sway of Rajat Gupta. Gupta had this amazing ability to straddle different worlds: Indian, American, philanthropy, and business.  I can't think of anyone today who could take that mantle. Gupta was also a pioneer. I remember working at the Wall Street Journal in 1994, when McKinsey announced that he had been elected by the partnership to be managing director. As an Indian-American myself, I felt a sense of pride but also wondered,  "Who is this man who has managed to make it to the top of a very American organization?" He was an inspiration to a young reporter like myself, even though he had nothing to do with me and we were in different fields.

TF: How has the book been received so far?
AR: I expected to get a number of angry emails from members of the South Asian community after an excerpt ran in the New York Times magazine. I was stunned when I didn't get any, and in fact, got about a dozen positive emails from South Asian readers who said they'd enjoyed the piece. One thing that people took issue with was my suggestion that Rajat Gupta had been played by Raj Rajaratnam. One person asked me if I had been naïve in suggesting that he had been played when I know that corruption is rampant in India. But when I was writing the book, I wanted to be very careful. I know corruption is widespread in India, but I believe that the corruption gene is evenly distributed. There aren't more corrupt people in India than there are in America. That's why this story is so important: The misstep of one casts a shadow on all. Rajat Gupta had a responsibility not only to conduct himself well for his own sake, but also for his children and all other Indians.

TF: What did you learn about the Indian-American immigrant community from writing the book?

AR: It was only when I started digging into the story that I realized how successful Indian immigrants have been. There's been a lot written about the Chinese and the "Tiger Mom" phenomenon, but when you look at the statistics, you see that Indian-Americans surpass every other Asian immigrant community by a significant margin in terms of income and education. Today, Indian-Americans are not confined to doing what they did when I was growing up in the 70s. They're not just college professors and doctors - they're in every field. Even the prosecutors who went after Rajat Gupta are Indian: Preet Bharara, the U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York, and Sanjay Wadhwa of the Securities and Exchange Commission. It really speaks to the strength of the community and how far it has come since Indians started immigrating to the U.S. en masse in the early 1980s.


TF: Why do you think they've been so successful in the U.S.?
AR: In 1965, Lyndon Johnson signed the Hart-Celler act, which said immigrant quotas would no longer be based on country of origin, but rather on skills. So the Indians who came post-1965 were really the brightest and the best. They were people like my father, who was a scientist; they were people like Rajat Gupta, who went to the Indian Institute of Technology in Delhi and studied mechanical engineering, as well as Gupta's wife, Anita, who also studied engineering. They were technologically-minded people. A University of California, Los Angeles professor I spoke to says the average Indian in the U.S. is 10,000 times more likely to have a PhD than the average Indian in India.

TF: As India continues to rise as a global power, do you think fewer highly educated Indians will move to the U.S.?

AR: There are so many options for Indians in India today that there isn't the same hunger to come to America as there was in Rajat Gupta's generation. That said, I still think the U.S. is a bit like a Swiss finishing school for Indians. You go to America, you get your American pedigree, and then you come back to India. For example, Anand Mahindra was schooled at Harvard University and Harvard Business School and now runs his family business back in India-Mahindra & Mahindra, one of the country's largest auto manufacturers. I think a large cohort of Indians will still come to America, but in the past they would have stayed in America and built a life. Today, because of the dazzling array of opportunities in India, they will probably go home.



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USA Africa Dialogue Series - US to provide $7 billion to "Power Africa"

US to provide $7 billion to "Power Africa"

In sub-Saharan Africa where more that two-thirds of its population is without electricity, and more than 85% of the rural population lack access.

President Barack Obama pledged $7 billion Sunday before leaving South Africa to help combat frequent power blackouts in sub-Saharan Africa.


USA Africa Dialogue Series - EZEKIEL ADEYEMI ORE OYEYIPO, FORMER HEAD OF DEPARTMENT OF LG,ABU, ZARIA, NIGERIA, DIES AT 81.

        Chief Ezekiel Ore Oyeyipo  was born and raised  at Ile  Osolo, Esie,  in Irepodun  Local Government  Area of Kwara State. He belonged to Igbomina  Ethnic Group  of the Yoruba Kingdom.
         He  received his early education  from the Anglican  Church School, Esie.  Chief Ezekiel Oyeyipo  worked his way  through hard work, endurance and perseverance.  He was educated in Nigeria, United Kingdom, United States of America and the Hague, Netherlands where he obtained his Masters Degree in Economic Development.
         He worked as   Civil Servant  in the Northern Regional Government of Nigeria for over forty years in different capacities  as:  Head of management  Services, and  Chief  Protocol  to the late Premier of Northern Region, Sir Ahmadu Bello.
        When Kwara State was created, he returned to his state of origin.    He was  appointed the First Under Secretary, Establishment in Kwara  state.   After some years  as Under Secretary, he was promoted to the position of Permanent Secretary and performed this function in nearly all the Ministries including: Education, Health, Finance, Local Government and Public Works.  He served as Chairman of Government Parastatal Organizations.
        After retiring from the Civil Service  in 1978, Chief Ezekiel Oyeyipo joined the Institute Of Administration, Ahmadu Bello, University, Zaria as Expert in Local Government and Public Administration.   He became the Head of Local Government Department in 1983 In 1984, he was a member of Dasuki Commission to review local government administration for possible creation of additional Councils. 
        In August 1990, he was appointed Deputy Governor of Kwara State under the Military innovation.  At the end of his service as Deputy Governor, he was appointed the Chairman of the Peoples Bank of Nigeria which was Ibrahim Babangida's idea. 
         He was happily married to his wife of many years  and loved his  chidren most dearly.  He called them  his "Best Friends"  Chief Ezekiel Oyeyipo wasa  good Christian and served his Church and God Faithfully.
MAY HIS DEAR SOUL REST IN PERFECT PEACE, AMEN,
Professor Oladimeji Aborisade,
Africana Studies Department, UNC at Charlotte, NC 28214.
 
     

USA Africa Dialogue Series - Tomorrow I Will be Twenty Years Old: Alain Mabanckou (Author), Helen Stevenson (Translator), J. M. G. Le Clezio (Foreword)

http://www.amazon.com/Tomorrow-Will-Twenty-Years-Old/dp/1846685842/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&qid=1372635939&sr=8-5&keywords=alain+mabanckou


Tomorrow I Will be Twenty Years Old: Alain Mabanckou (Author), Helen Stevenson (Translator), J. M. G. Le Clezio (Foreword)


Synopsis:

From the winner of the Grand Prix de la Litterature - Mabanckou's trademark humour and surrealism combine in an autobiographical novel. Michel is ten years old, living in Pointe Noire, Congo, in the 1970s. His mother sells peanuts at the market, his father works at the Victory Palace Hotel, and brings home books left behind by the white guests. Planes cross the sky overhead, and Michel and his friend Lounes dream about the countries where they'll land. While news comes over the radio of the American hostage crisis in Tehran, the death of the Shah, the scandal of the Boukassa diamonds, Michel struggles with the demands of his twelve year old girlfriend Caroline, who threatens to leave him for a bully in the football team. But most worrying for Michel, the witch doctor has told his mother that he has hidden the key to her womb, and must return it before she can have another child. Somehow he must find it. "Tomorrow I'll Be Twenty" is a humurous and poignant account of an African childhood, drawn from Alain Mabanckou's life.

Editorial Reviews

Review

"'Africa's Samuel Beckett... Mabanckou's freewheeling prose marries classical French elegance with Paris slag and a Congolese beat' (Economist) 'Mabanckou's irreverent wit and madcap energy have made him a big name in France' (Giles Foden, author of the Last King of Scotland) 'A dizzying combination of erudition, bawdy humour and linguistic effervescence' (Financial Times)"


About the Author



Biography

Alain Mabanckou is considered to be one of the most talented and prolific writers in the French language today and the first francophone sub-saharian African writer to be published by Gallimard in its prestigious "collection" called La Blanche. He was born in Congo-Brazzaville in 1966 and is mostly known for his novels, notably Verre Cassé (BROKEN GLASS) which was unanimously praised by the press, critics and readers alike. 

In 2006 he published Memoires de porc-épic (Memoirs of a Porcupine) which garnered him the Prix RENAUDOT, one of the highest distinctions in literature written in french. His novels are published in more than fifteen languages. 

He his currently a professor of French and Francophone studies at the University of California-Los Angeles.

Funmi Tofowomo Okelola

-The Art of Living and Impermanence

http://www.cafeafricana.com

http://www.indigokafe.com


USA Africa Dialogue Series - Blue White Red: A Novel (Global African Voices): Alain Mabanckou (Author), Alison Dundy (Translator)

http://www.amazon.com/Blue-White-Red-Global-African/dp/0253007917/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1372635683&sr=8-1&keywords=alain+mabanckou



Blue White Red: A Novel (Global African Voices): Alain Mabanckou (Author), Alison Dundy (Translator)

Synopsis:

This tale of wild adventure reveals the dashed hopes of Africans living between worlds. When Moki returns to his village from France wearing designer clothes and affecting all the manners of a Frenchman, Massala-Massala, who lives the life of a humble peanut farmer after giving up his studies, begins to dream of following in Moki's footsteps. Together, the two take wing for Paris, where Massala-Massala finds himself a part of an underworld of out-of-work undocumented immigrants. After a botched attempt to sell metro passes purchased with a stolen checkbook, he winds up in jail and is deported. Blue White Red is a novel of postcolonial Africa where young people born into poverty dream of making it big in the cities of their former colonial masters. Alain Mabanckou's searing commentary on the lives of Africans in France is cut with the parody of African villagers who boast of a son in the country of Digol.


Editorial Reviews

Review

"Mabanckou's provocative novel probes the many facets of the 'migration adventure,' including the shame that accompanies migrants home when their foreign sojourn ends in failure." —Booklist

(Booklist)

"Mabanckou dazzles with technical dexterity and emotional depth. Vulnerability beckons in this masterful story about a world we always knew was too good to be true, yet reminds us that new skies appear and new seasons begin. (Starred review)" —Publishers Weekly

(Publishers Weekly)

"Blue White Red stands at the beginning of the author's remarkable and multifaceted career as a novelist, essayist and poet...this debut novel shows much of his style and substance in remarkable ways...Dundy's translation is excellent." —Africa Book Club

(Africa Book Club)

"Alain Mabanckou counts as one of the most successful voices of young African literature in the French language." —Ulrich Schreiber, Internationales literaturfestival berlin

(Ulrich Schreiber Internationales literaturfestival berlin)

"Alain Mabanckou can be defined as the 'clear guide' of a new generation of Congolese writers." —Infopagecongo

(Infopagecongo)


About the Author


Alain Mabanckou is the author of several prize-winning novels, including Mémoires de porc-épic (Memoirs of a Porcupine). Blue White Red is winner of the Grand Prix Littéraire de l'Afrique Noire. He is Professor of French and Francophone Studies at the University of California, Los Angeles.

Alison Dundy lives in New York City and works as a librarian, archivist, and translator. She has also translated Sony Labou Tansi's Life and a Half (IUP, 2011).


Funmi Tofowomo Okelola

-The Art of Living and Impermanence

http://www.cafeafricana.com

http://www.indigokafe.com


Re: USA Africa Dialogue Series - STAR QUESTION: What Possessed Him? Rajat Gupta's Great Fall and America's Indian Elites

"One must always remember who one is, where [the] one has come from, where one is, and sometimes what time it is."---Ogugua Anunoby
 
Great and thoughtful words for one's responses to life's swift moving compass. Thanks.


From: "Emeagwali, Gloria (History)" <emeagwali@mail.ccsu.edu>
To: "usaafricadialogue@googlegroups.com" <usaafricadialogue@googlegroups.com>
Sent: Sunday, June 30, 2013 2:21 PM
Subject: RE: USA Africa Dialogue Series - STAR QUESTION: What Possessed Him? Rajat Gupta's Great Fall and America's Indian Elites

'The bigger the fish, the more determined the fisherman.' OA

I really like that one. A nice cautionary note!


Professor Gloria Emeagwali
africahistory.net
vimeo.com/user5946750/videos
Documentaries on Africa and the African Diaspora
________________________________________
From: usaafricadialogue@googlegroups.com [usaafricadialogue@googlegroups.com] On Behalf Of Anunoby, Ogugua [AnunobyO@lincolnu.edu]
Sent: Sunday, June 30, 2013 10:02 AM
To: usaafricadialogue@googlegroups.com (USAAfricaDialogue@googlegroups.com)
Subject: FW: USA Africa Dialogue Series - STAR QUESTION: What Possessed Him? Rajat Gupta's Great Fall and America's Indian Elites

I might have Gloria. Thank you.
Success corrupts the unwary it seems to me. The man's success in corporate America may have caused him to believe that he was greater, smarter, more indispensable than he really was. It is thinking like that that helps to make successful people less thoughtful and risk averse than they are advised, and need to be. The bigger the fish, the more determined the fisherman. One must always remember who one is, where the one has come from,  where one is, and sometimes what time it is.

oa



-----Original Message-----
From: usaafricadialogue@googlegroups.com [mailto:usaafricadialogue@googlegroups.com] On Behalf Of Emeagwali, Gloria (History)
Sent: Saturday, June 29, 2013 8:23 AM
To: usaafricadialogue@googlegroups.com; NaijaPolitics e-Group; naijaintellects; OmoOdua; nigerianid@yahoogroups.com; Ra'ayi; ekiti ekitigroups; Yan Arewa
Subject: RE: USA Africa Dialogue Series - STAR QUESTION: What Possessed Him? Rajat Gupta's Great Fall and America's Indian Elites


You may  have  missed one point, OA. This guy was seen as a threat to the ' regular'
capitalists. There  may be  a pigmentation and ethnic  factor in the mix. What of all the corrupt banking  and housing miscreants who remain untouched? This is to send a message to potential  immigrant rivals.
This is not to say that he  is completely innocent, though.





Professor Gloria Emeagwali
africahistory.net
vimeo.com/user5946750/videos
Documentaries on Africa and the African Diaspora


________________________________
From: usaafricadialogue@googlegroups.com [usaafricadialogue@googlegroups.com] On Behalf Of Anunoby, Ogugua [AnunobyO@lincolnu.edu]
Sent: Saturday, June 29, 2013 6:32 AM
To: usaafricadialogue@googlegroups.com; NaijaPolitics e-Group; naijaintellects; OmoOdua; nigerianid@yahoogroups.com; Ra'ayi; ekiti ekitigroups; Yan Arewa
Subject: RE: USA Africa Dialogue Series - STAR QUESTION: What Possessed Him? Rajat Gupta's Great Fall and America's Indian Elites

"An object lesson for all immigrants" everywhere.
Oliver de Coque, the late Nigerian musical artist famously said that "a town belongs to some and not all who live in her". There are landlords and there are tenants . One recalls that in the movie "West Side Story" all are reminded that "everything is good in America if you stay on your own side". I would say "the right side". There is who one is. There is who one believes the one is. It is important to know the difference. Power and influence do not always come with professional success, especially away from home. There are exceptions and limits. Everyone is advised to know who they really are, and how a system that might hit them works. Does Rajat Gupta deserve some sympathy? May be. Should he have known better? Certainly.
The corruption gene (if there is any such thing) may be evenly distributed in the human race but it is more recessive in some countries than in others. Are there more corrupt people in India than "in America"? Yes probably. India seems to be more tolerant of corruption. India has more people. Then again, what is corruption?

oa



From: usaafricadialogue@googlegroups.com [mailto:usaafricadialogue@googlegroups.com] On Behalf Of Mobolaji Aluko
Sent: Thursday, June 27, 2013 10:09 PM
To: USAAfrica Dialogue; NaijaPolitics e-Group; naijaintellects; OmoOdua; nigerianid@yahoogroups.com; Ra'ayi; ekiti ekitigroups; Yan Arewa
Subject: USA Africa Dialogue Series - STAR QUESTION: What Possessed Him? Rajat Gupta's Great Fall and America's Indian Elites


QUOTE


One person asked me if I had been naïve in suggesting that [Rajat Gupta] had been played when I know that corruption is rampant in India. But when I was writing the book, I wanted to be very careful. I know corruption is widespread in India, but I believe that corruption the gene is evenly distributed. There aren't more corrupt people in India than there are in America. That's why this story is so important: The misstep of one casts a shadow on all. Rajat Gupta had a responsibility not only to conduct himself well for his own sake, but also for his children and all other Indians.

UNQUOTE


An object lesson for all immigrants here.....



Bolaji Aluko

----------------------------------------------------

http://www.thefinancialist.com/what-possessed-him-rajat-guptas-great-fall-and-americas-indian-elites/

The Financialist



*        ABOUT<http://www.thefinancialist.com/about/>
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*        AFFAIRS: Q&A<http://www.thefinancialist.com/category/affairs/qa-affairs/>
What Possessed Him? Rajat Gupta's Great Fall and America's Indian Elites Former Goldman Sachs board member Rajat Gupta exits Manhattan federal court after a pre-trial hearing last year in New York. (Photo by Seth Wenig, Associated Press.)

BY: ARIEL RAMCHANDANI
PUBLISHED: JUNE 24, 2013


For many people, the biggest shock of the Galleon Group's insider trading case was not the implosion of the hedge fund group, nor the conviction of its leader, Raj Rajaratnam. It was the indictment-and subsequent conviction-of Rajaratnam's friend, Rajat Gupta. The former managing director of McKinsey & Company, Gupta was not only one of the most respected members of the Indian-American business community, but he had achieved even greater public renown as a leading global philanthropist in his post-McKinsey career. His fall from grace was the true shocker in an already-scandalous affair.

Last year, Gupta was sentenced to two years in prison for sharing confidential information he learned as a board member of both Goldman Sachs and Procter & Gamble with Rajaratnam. In a new book, "The Billionaire's Apprentice: The Rise of The Indian-American Elite and The Fall of The Galleon Hedge Fund," journalist Anita Raghavan seeks to find out why Gupta risked his stellar reputation in joining forces with Rajaratnam. She chronicles Gupta's life from his childhood in post-partition India through his tenure at McKinsey, the world's most elite consulting firm. The tale culminates with Gupta's fall at the hands of New York federal prosecutor Preet Bharara, who was also born in India but raised in the U.S. Through Gupta's story, Raghavan also provides an inside look at the community of Indian elites in the United States.

The Financialist: Why did you frame your story around Gupta instead of Rajaratnam, who was at the center of the federal insider trading case?
Anita Raghavan: Of all the protagonists in the Galleon hedge fund case, Gupta was the most interesting. He came from very humble roots, and as a teenager, he lost both of his parents. He shouldered all the responsibility of the family, and he worked very hard to get himself to America, then to Harvard Business School, and then to McKinsey. He served three terms as McKinsey's managing director, and his Rolodex included Kofi Annan and Bill Gates. I was intrigued by the question of why someone who had so much going for him got involved with a short-term trader like Raj Rajaratnam, who was so different from him.

TF: So what did you ultimately conclude?
AR: When Gupta came back to New York in the 1990s, his world changed. For most of his career, he had worked in the hinterlands of Scandinavia and Chicago. When he came to New York, he started lusting after things he didn't care about before. Here was a man who had bought his previous homes sight unseen. But then he purchased one of the most storied pieces of real estate in Connecticut, a palatial estate once owned by the founder of J.C. Penney. He started mingling with a group of financiers. I think he felt out of their league-at least financially speaking-and he wanted to be part of that group.

There's a wonderful talk he gave at Columbia Business School about a year after he stepped down from the helm of McKinsey. You can see in that speech a man really casting about for what he wanted to do next in life and not feeling entirely at peace. At one point, someone asked him, "Are you happy?" and he said, "On some level, I'm happy. On other levels, I'm in the midst of a professional transition, and I'm not so happy."

TF: Gupta's success at McKinsey opened the door for many more Indian leaders in business. He was an icon. Who will replace him in the Indian-American imagination?
AR: I don't think there is anyone with the influence and sway of Rajat Gupta. Gupta had this amazing ability to straddle different worlds: Indian, American, philanthropy, and business.  I can't think of anyone today who could take that mantle. Gupta was also a pioneer. I remember working at the Wall Street Journal in 1994, when McKinsey announced that he had been elected by the partnership to be managing director. As an Indian-American myself, I felt a sense of pride but also wondered,  "Who is this man who has managed to make it to the top of a very American organization?" He was an inspiration to a young reporter like myself, even though he had nothing to do with me and we were in different fields.

TF: How has the book been received so far?
AR: I expected to get a number of angry emails from members of the South Asian community after an excerpt ran in the New York Times magazine. I was stunned when I didn't get any, and in fact, got about a dozen positive emails from South Asian readers who said they'd enjoyed the piece. One thing that people took issue with was my suggestion that Rajat Gupta had been played by Raj Rajaratnam. One person asked me if I had been naïve in suggesting that he had been played when I know that corruption is rampant in India. But when I was writing the book, I wanted to be very careful. I know corruption is widespread in India, but I believe that the corruption gene is evenly distributed. There aren't more corrupt people in India than there are in America. That's why this story is so important: The misstep of one casts a shadow on all. Rajat Gupta had a responsibility not only to conduct himself well for his own sake, but also for his children and all other Indians.

TF: What did you learn about the Indian-American immigrant community from writing the book?
AR: It was only when I started digging into the story that I realized how successful Indian immigrants have been. There's been a lot written about the Chinese and the "Tiger Mom" phenomenon, but when you look at the statistics, you see that Indian-Americans surpass every other Asian immigrant community by a significant margin in terms of income and education. Today, Indian-Americans are not confined to doing what they did when I was growing up in the 70s. They're not just college professors and doctors - they're in every field. Even the prosecutors who went after Rajat Gupta are Indian: Preet Bharara, the U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York, and Sanjay Wadhwa of the Securities and Exchange Commission. It really speaks to the strength of the community and how far it has come since Indians started immigrating to the U.S. en masse in the early 1980s.

TF: Why do you think they've been so successful in the U.S.?
AR: In 1965, Lyndon Johnson signed the Hart-Celler act, which said immigrant quotas would no longer be based on country of origin, but rather on skills. So the Indians who came post-1965 were really the brightest and the best. They were people like my father, who was a scientist; they were people like Rajat Gupta, who went to the Indian Institute of Technology in Delhi and studied mechanical engineering, as well as Gupta's wife, Anita, who also studied engineering. They were technologically-minded people. A University of California, Los Angeles professor I spoke to says the average Indian in the U.S. is 10,000 times more likely to have a PhD than the average Indian in India.

TF: As India continues to rise as a global power, do you think fewer highly educated Indians will move to the U.S.?
AR: There are so many options for Indians in India today that there isn't the same hunger to come to America as there was in Rajat Gupta's generation. That said, I still think the U.S. is a bit like a Swiss finishing school for Indians. You go to America, you get your American pedigree, and then you come back to India. For example, Anand Mahindra was schooled at Harvard University and Harvard Business School and now runs his family business back in India-Mahindra & Mahindra, one of the country's largest auto manufacturers. I think a large cohort of Indians will still come to America, but in the past they would have stayed in America and built a life. Today, because of the dazzling array of opportunities in India, they will probably go home.


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Re: USA Africa Dialogue Series - Fwd: France Has Economically Enslaved West African Countries

Dear Professor Mbodj:

Thank you for writing. Alright, let us remain on the CFA issue. The question is: Why should France continue to make monetary policy for independent and sovereign states in Africa? Even if the policies made turn out to be beneficial to the African peoples, that continued (involuntary) dependence of Africans on France dependence does not augur well for successful poverty alleviation efforts. Africans must take ownership of their problems and seek ways to resolve them.

It is unfortunate that many African countries, including Guinea under Touré, failed at independence and in the post-independence period, to sufficiently transform the critical domains and provide themselves with institutional arrangements that adequately constrain the state and, prevent civil servants and politicians from engaging in opportunism (e.g., corruption and rent seeking)--behaviors that are growth-inhibiting and that continue to contribute to poverty. Hence, even though Guinea was able to disengage itself from the French Community at independence, it, like many other new countries in the region, did not engage in the type of institutional reforms that would have deepened and institutionalized democracy and prevented the type of authoritarian and non-participatory governance  that came to characterize the first 50 years of independence.

Yes, it is true that the right to self-determination was legally exercised when these francophone countries were set up in 1958-1960. However, in practical terms, this was not the case. In my opinion,  one of the most important aspects of self-determination is for a country or community to determine its own laws and institutions--that is, the rules that would govern socio-political interaction, provide citizens with the wherewithal to organize their private lives (e.g., engage in entrepreneurial activities to create the wealth that they need to meet their needs), enhance peaceful coexistence, etc. The development of such institutional arrangements, for a new country must start with constitution making. For it to be effective and produce outcomes beneficial to the diverse populations that exist in the new country, constitution making must be bottom-up, participatory, inclusive, and people-driven. This process-driven constitution making was not undertaken in the francophone countries at independence or even afterwards--the model adopted, in some cases, almost verbatim, was the French Constitution of 1958. Hence, I do not believe that what happened in these countries during the 1958-1960 period was true self-determination.

Guinea, by rejecting de Gaulle's offer, had the right approach, but failed to follow through and hence, ended up with the same type of anachronistic and dysfunctional governance institutions that have pervaded its neighbors for years.

I am sorry, but I did not understand the reference to China.

It is true that the CFA Franc Zone has provided its participants with some level of financial stability, but the question is, at what cost? But the bigger issue is, why can't these countries and perhaps, many more, form a currency union without guarantees from the French Treasury or some other outside party?

Stay well.




On Sat, Jun 29, 2013 at 12:27 PM, kenneth harrow <harrow@msu.edu> wrote:
[please reenrol professor mbodj on the list]

Purchase, NY 10577
Phone: 914-323 7183
Email: mohamed.mbodj@mville.edu
_______________________________
From: Mohamed Mbodj
Sent: Friday, June 28, 2013 10:53 PM
To: usaafricadialogue@googlegroups.com
Subject: RE: USA Africa Dialogue Series - Fwd: RE: CFA

Dear Professor Mbaku,

I am trying to send this, but previously I failed to get through, so bear with me, just in case I need Ken Harrow's link again.

I am not sure why you inject Apartheid here, even if you equate it to colonialism. And I agree with you about colonial policies objectives. On the other hand, I just want to remain on that CFA issue. I am aware of the kind of the studies you mentioned, and I have participated in a few since the late 1970s when I was still teaching at UCAD. My point is I still do not see how much France has robbed so much UMOA countries though the CFA system. Yes again, monetarist policies alone do not build economic performance! I am not the one making that point. The sovereignty issue you invoke if more of a spurious claim as it does not feed the populations, nor does it make a country like Guinea "bigger than they are really"!. In countries dominated by a Sekou Toure, where are the decisions made by the "citizens"? Ghana may be doing "better" than its CFA neighbors, but it was already the case in the 1950s! Is the right of self-determination linked to an independent currency? Then how id China doing? And for my own self-esteem, I rather use the CFA non figurative notes and coins than currency adorning the founding father's picture. By the way, "the right to self-determination" was exercised when these governments were set up in 1958-1960, unless you consider that only Guinea has exercised these rights "correctly".

Mohamed Mbodj, Ph.D.
Professor,
History Department and
African & African-American Studies
Manhattanville College
2900, Purchase Street
Purchase, NY 10577
Phone: 914-323 7183
Email: mohamed.mbodj@mville.edu



-------- Original Message --------
Subject: France Has Economically Enslaved West African Countries
Date: Sat, 29 Jun 2013 03:10:02 +0000
From: Mohamed Mbodj <Mohamed.Mbodj@mville.edu>
To: harrow@msu.edu <harrow@msu.edu>


Ken,

Just sent this, but I got send failure message back!

Mohamed Mbodj, Ph.D.
Professor,
History Department and
African & African-American Studies
Manhattanville College
2900, Purchase Street
Purchase, NY 10577
Phone: 914-323 7183
Email: mohamed.mbodj@mville.edu
_______________________________
From: Mohamed Mbodj
Sent: Friday, June 28, 2013 10:53 PM
To: usaafricadialogue@googlegroups.com
Subject: RE: USA Africa Dialogue Series - Fwd: RE: CFA

Dear Professor Mbaku,

I am trying to send this, but previously I failed to get through, so bear with me, just in case I need Ken Harrow's link again.

I am not sure why you inject Apartheid here, even if you equate it to colonialism. And I agree with you about colonial policies objectives. On the other hand, I just want to remain on that CFA issue. I am aware of the kind of the studies you mentioned, and I have participated in a few since the late 1970s when I was still teaching at UCAD. My point is I still do not see how much France has robbed so much UMOA countries though the CFA system. Yes again, monetarist policies alone do not build economic performance! I am not the one making that point. The sovereignty issue you invoke if more of a spurious claim as it does not feed the populations, nor does it make a country like Guinea "bigger than they are really"!. In countries dominated by a Sekou Toure, where are the decisions made by the "citizens"? Ghana may be doing "better" than its CFA neighbors, but it was already the case in the 1950s! Is the right of self-determination linked to an independent currency? Then how id China doing? And for my own self-esteem, I rather use the CFA non figurative notes and coins than currency adorning the founding father's picture. By the way, "the right to self-determination" was exercised when these governments were set up in 1958-1960, unless you consider that only Guinea has exercised these rights "correctly".

Mohamed Mbodj, Ph.D.
Professor,
History Department and
African & African-American Studies
Manhattanville College
2900, Purchase Street
Purchase, NY 10577
Phone: 914-323 7183
Email: mohamed.mbodj@mville.edu


This electronic message contains information from Manhattanville College, which may be confidential, privileged or otherwise protected from disclosure. The information is intended to be used solely by the recipient(s) named. If you are not an intended recipient, be aware that any review, disclosure, copying, distribution or use of this transmission or its contents is prohibited. If you have received this transmission in error, please notify us at the reply email address.
--   kenneth w. harrow   faculty excellence advocate  distinguished professor of english  michigan state university  department of english  619 red cedar road  room C-614 wells hall  east lansing, mi 48824  ph. 517 803 8839  harrow@msu.edu


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JOHN MUKUM MBAKU, ESQ.
J.D. (Law), Ph.D. (Economics)
Graduate Certificate in Environmental and Natural Resources Law
Nonresident Senior Fellow, The Brookings Institution
Attorney & Counselor at Law (Licensed in Utah)
Presidential Distinguished Professor of Economics & Willard L. Eccles Professor of Economics and John S. Hinckley Fellow
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(801) 626-7423 Fax

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Re: USA Africa Dialogue Series - Fwd: Fw: Patience Jonathan is illiterate

Diaspora! I did not always live in the Diaspora. Civilized? I do not know what that means. Anyway, human decency is (or should be) a universal trait and should be practiced by all societies. And many do, including those in Nigeria.


On Sun, Jun 30, 2013 at 2:33 AM, Segun Ogungbemi <seguno2013@gmail.com> wrote:
Thanks for your emotional democratic expression on my comment. The import of my argument anchors on what the Bible says, "What God has joined together let no man put asunder." Since God has joined together our First Lady with her husband Goodluck Jonathan, and once we voted for the husband we equally voted for the wife. That is the logic. The constitution of Nigeria recognizes marriage as the bedrock of family institution. 
It is immoral, in my view, to denigrate our First Lady. There are better ways of telling her in writing our criticisms of what we perceived her to have done wrong without insulting her. It is civil and more honorable, Methinks. 
Prof. Segun Ogungbemi. 

Sent from my iPhone

On Jun 29, 2013, at 9:59 PM, shina73_1999@yahoo.com wrote:

"I voted for him and by implication his wife. It is morally offensive to abuse or insult our First Lady. She is not a saint and we should not expect too much from her. 
It is not correct to say that our First Lady is illiterate. If she were illiterate she would not be a permanent secretary."

Prof. Ogungbemi

Prof.,
Again, I have reasons to be worried and in fact quarrel with your reasoning. First the undemocratic syllogism of the first part and the surprising-in fact, naive-
assumption behind the second.

When we vote in a democratic election, do we vote for the person standing for election AND the spouse? Did Americans vote for Obama and Mitchell? Is there even a democratic assumption that that's what we usually do? What is the logical import of your 'by implication' in that statement? If that is a legitimate constituent of democratic election, I am definitely ignorant. Wonder which aspect of the Nigerian constitution or democratic theory says that.

Second, I'm deeply worried that you think Patience Jonathan got the permsec post due to due diligence and meritocratic consideration. Should someone we shouldn't expect too much from be considered for a serious post? "To whom much is given..." can equally be inverted to read "to whom little is expected..."

We aren't talking about some authoritarian tradition here. Wiredu warns us about such inordinate respect. We are talking about lamenting bad leadership and a culture that raise mediocre to the level of honour they don't deserve. If democracy must work, we need to make life difficult for those people. And abusive language is the least of the weapons in the arsenal.


Adeshina Afolayan
Sent from my BlackBerry wireless device from MTN

From: Segun Ogungbemi <seguno2013@gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 29 Jun 2013 17:29:16 +0100
Subject: Re: USA Africa Dialogue Series - Fwd: Fw: Patience Jonathan is illiterate

It is sad to hear or read the kind of invectives poured on our First Lady. In Yoruba tradition we were taught to give honor and respect to elders and leaders. 
I don't know how old Junaid Mohammad is but it does not matter. He needs to respect our President and the First Lady. We elected our president. I voted for him and by implication his wife. It is morally offensive to abuse or insult our First Lady. She is not a saint and we should not expect too much from her. 
It is not correct to say that our First Lady is illiterate. If she were illiterate she would not be a permanent secretary. 
The politics in Rivers is a PDP affair. The people who elected Governor Rotimi Amaechi will not want the situation to deteriorate to the level it went in the 60s in the defunct Western Region before a decisive action is taken to quell the fire of destruction. The fair of Mihammad is understood but please respect our leaders particularly,  the First Lady.   
SO

Sent from my iPhone

On Jun 29, 2013, at 11:29 AM, Ayo Obe <ayo.m.o.obe@gmail.com> wrote:

Tradition?  In which country is that then?

But  "irresponsible, unconstitutional and bizarre"?  Now that is language of which I thoroughly approve.  Pity Junaid Muhammad spoiled it by adding the "illiterate" tag, as that brought it down to the level of vulgar abuse.

However, while I can't speak about what one should approve of "as an African", I do know that Nigerians take particular delight in tagging people and their actions "illiterate", no matter how many doctorate degrees they have earned or had conferred upon them ...

Ayo
I invite you to follow me on Twitter @naijama

On 29 Jun 2013, at 04:12, ibk2005@gmail.com wrote:

Is it not the tradition for first Ladies to respect themselves and keep out of shady deals?

Why do you not find the grabby, corrupt and shameful behaviour of this woman offensive?

This is the very reason why nonentities have usurped every level of power in Nigeria. This obsequous and embarassing fawning to please those in power and never speak truth to power.

Are you proud of the behaviour of this woman? Is she not a complete illiterate? Can the wife of a President also be a Permanent Secretary in a state! What redeeming feature can you find in this woman? Is the EFCC files on her or her shameful utterances or sheer disregard of protocol?

Please let us try to be honest with ourselves.

Cheers.


IBK
Sent from my BlackBerry wireless device from MTN

From: John Mbaku <jmbaku@weber.edu>
Date: Fri, 28 Jun 2013 15:33:05 -0600
Subject: Re: USA Africa Dialogue Series - Fwd: Fw: Patience Jonathan is illiterate

One can make one's point without engaging in demeaning and divisive language. Perhaps, more important is the fact that it is the tradition in virtually all countries, regardless of constitutional mandates, to respect the wife of the head of state. In fact, it is in the tradition of African societies, not just to respect all women, but especially to respect married ones. While this political critic may have a point to make, it is consumed totally by the abusive and offensive language. "Illiterate actions?" What does that mean?

As an African, I find such disrespect, especially from a highly educated critic, to be extremely offensive and not productive. By the way, I am not from Rivers State.


On Fri, Jun 28, 2013 at 2:02 PM, Ibrahim Abdullah <ibdullah@gmail.com> wrote:




----- Forwarded Message -----
From: SAKA AZIMAZI <azimazi@yahoo.com>
To: "nedeoga@yahoo.com" <nedeoga@yahoo.com>; "whosayna2@yahoo.com" <whosayna2@yahoo.com>; "huseinawaziri@gmail.com" <huseinawaziri@gmail.com>; Maikudi Jimoh <maikudij@yahoo.com>; Sunny Agboju <sunnyagboju@yahoo.com>; "etemeya@yahoo.com" <etemeya@yahoo.com>; "ozikarim@yahoo.com" <ozikarim@yahoo.com>; "aaffiong@yahoo.com" <aaffiong@yahoo.com>; "mykeonum@yahoo.com" <mykeonum@yahoo.com>
Sent: Wednesday, June 26, 2013 10:13 PM
Subject: Patience Jonathan is illiterate

Make una see me see wahala o! See what my enemies sent to my box. Good morning!
 
Well-known political critic, Junaid Muhammad, has called fresh attention to recent developments in the Peoples Democratic Party (PDP) at the national level, warning that they are snowballing into a full blown governmental and security crises in Rivers State.
 
And he brought the First Lady under the hammer for her role in the chaos.
In a press statement issued today in Kano on Wednesday, Dr. Muhammad described Rivers as "coming to the limelight because of the irresponsible, unconstitutional and bizarre, illiterate actions, of the so called first lady Mrs. Patience Jonathan, who hails from the island village of Okrika in Rivers State and who sees not only Okrika but the whole of Rivers States, as her personal domain to exploit, abuse and destabilize as she sees fit because her husband Jonathan happens to be the president."
 
He noted that the Nigerian constitution makes no provision whatsoever for the post of First Lady and confers no rights, privileges and/or responsibilities on spouses of our president or heads of governments.
 
"It is therefore illegal and completely ultra vires the constitution for any citizen, president or his spouse to usurp executive powers, and go about throwing their weight, as if they were legally recognized holders of such offices according to the law," he warned. " As at the time of writing, the commissioner of police in Rivers, his command structure and other security services are at the command of Patience Jonathan, and by her and presidential orders, most security facilities due governor, the speaker and others so entitled, have been withdrawn. Mean-while professional thugs and all manner of criminals are being recruited and pressed into service to destabilize the elected government of Rivers State."
 
Stressing that those who do not learn from history are condemned to repeat its mistakes, Dr. Muhammad pointed out that current developments in the PDP and especially in Rivers State bear an uncanny resemblance to the old Western Region, which led to the collapse of the first republic, with very serious and bloody consequences. Then and now, the popularly elected leaders of those parts of the country were prevented from exercising political power and control, and the operations of the police, the army and the rump of security services were interfered with in a brazen political manner.
 
"The current CP Rivers, is bending over backwards to accommodate the president, his cronies and his illiterate wife, to ignore or pervert the law and the constitution and norms of decent political behavior, to harass, intimidate Governor Rotimi Amaechi, and thus destabilize, a strategic state like Rivers. Those in the PDP who imagine that this serious and fundamental crisis can be contained by some band aid or artificial cordon sanitaire, have a shocker awaiting them," he said.
 
He noted that the overriding attitude of PDP leadership, the PDP president, his cronies etc. is an open invitation to anarchy, for his party, his tottering crisis prone government and most unfortunately for Nigeria.
 
"The preponderance of the PDP in the governing processes is a clear and present danger to democracy," the statement said. "Add to that the dictatorial proclivities of the party leadership and penchant for hand picking illiterates and corrupt thugs into key and sensitive positions; you have the making of an inevitable disaster."
Dr. Muhammad stressed that the latest developments throw into doubt the very possibilities of elections in 2015, those elections being the very reason for the desperate manouvres now being undertaken.
 
"If the de-facto commander–in-chief, the de-facto defence Minister and army commander Gen. Ihejirika who is an in-law to Patience [Jonathan], and his police and S.S.S. counterparts, are behaving in openly political partisan manner as heads of Jonathan's personal militia, it goes without saying that Jega's INEC will hold no elections worth the name," he declared, calling on all Nigerians who cherish democracy to stand up and be counted.
He stressed that Rivers State and the fate of its governor must be of enormous concern to all democrats and patriots, pointing out that within Rivers State and beyond it, evil thrives when good and decent people take their eyes off the ball or pretend it is of no concern to them or is unrelated to neighborhoods.
 
"Personally I do not know and have never met Gov. Rotimi Amaechi in person, in Port Harcourt or anywhere else on earth," he declared. "I have not been to Rivers State since the expiry of my national service in the defunct OMPADEC (now NDDC) in 1996. I am however invested in Amaechi's struggles because I believe democracy is the only way to govern a free people rationally, and to exercise legitimate power over a free people. If the PDP and its incompetent president treat this country like a conquered and vanquished people, they must be cured of their delusion, soonest." 
 
Saka Azimazi
Network of NHRIs in West Africa (NNHRI-WA)
4th Floor, NHRC House
No. 19 Aguiyi Ironsi Street
Maitama, Abuja,
Nigeria



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JOHN MUKUM MBAKU, ESQ.
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Graduate Certificate in Environmental and Natural Resources Law
Nonresident Senior Fellow, The Brookings Institution
Attorney & Counselor at Law (Licensed in Utah)
Presidential Distinguished Professor of Economics & Willard L. Eccles Professor of Economics and John S. Hinckley Fellow
Department of Economics
Weber State University
3807 University Circle
Ogden, UT 84408-3807, USA
(801) 626-7442 Phone
(801) 626-7423 Fax

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JOHN MUKUM MBAKU, ESQ.
J.D. (Law), Ph.D. (Economics)
Graduate Certificate in Environmental and Natural Resources Law
Nonresident Senior Fellow, The Brookings Institution
Attorney & Counselor at Law (Licensed in Utah)
Presidential Distinguished Professor of Economics & Willard L. Eccles Professor of Economics and John S. Hinckley Fellow
Department of Economics
Weber State University
3807 University Circle
Ogden, UT 84408-3807, USA
(801) 626-7442 Phone
(801) 626-7423 Fax

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